Research

/Research
10 03, 2017

Too Much Information May Be Bad

By | March 10th, 2017|Research|0 Comments

Often in negotiating, a party may make a monetary demand without providing any reasoning behind it. I have often found that such a tactic does not work well because the other party will ask me “why”. She wants to know the reasoning behind the monetary demand.   So- I return to the first party to learn [...]

4 11, 2016

A Different Form of Implicit Bias

By | November 4th, 2016|Research|0 Comments

Once again, The Economist published an interesting study on “why posh people spend less time noticing others.” In an article entitled “Your Class determines how you look [sic] your fellow creatures” in the science and technology section of the October 11, 2016 issue, the unnamed author recounts the experiments of Dr. Pia Dietz and Dr. [...]

14 10, 2016

Why Is It So Difficult to Think “Outside The Box”?

By | October 14th, 2016|Research|0 Comments

I stumbled across an article in LiveScience.com which referred me to the actual article on theconversation.com entitled “Freaks, geeks, norms and mores: why people use the status quo as a moral compass” by Christina Tworek, a doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The article discusses a series of studies by the author [...]

23 09, 2016

Random Thoughts

By | September 23rd, 2016|Research|0 Comments

Recently (as part of a book club), I read The Psychology of Conflict by Raul Randolph (Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, London 2016) who is a barrister and mediator. His approach is to use existentialism as the vehicle through which to discuss the psychological aspects of mediation.  Although some participants of mediation may deny and avoid  it, [...]

16 09, 2016

Emotions Control

By | September 16th, 2016|Research|0 Comments

Recently, I stumbled across an interesting study published online by the ABA Journal (aka American Bar Association Journal). Researchers discovered that when the LSU Tigers unexpectedly lose a football game, the juvenile judges take their anger/frustration at the loss out on the juveniles before them by imposing longer sentences. (“Louisiana juveniles got longer sentences after [...]

8 07, 2016

It Ain’t Easy To Say “I am Sorry”

By | July 8th, 2016|Research|0 Comments

There are right ways and wrong ways to say “I am sorry”. Most of us have figured out the wrong ways… by accident. We try to apologize only to have it blow up in our faces because we continue on by trying to justify or excuse what we just did or failed to do. We [...]

17 06, 2016

Trusting Intuition

By | June 17th, 2016|Research|0 Comments

In his bestselling book, Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2011) notes that our brains contain two systems of thought: System 1 which “… operates automatically and quickly, with little or no effort and no sense of voluntary control” (Id. at 20) and System 2 which “…allocates attention to [...]

20 05, 2016

Risk Taking: It is a matter of biology.

By | May 20th, 2016|Research|0 Comments

Are you a risk taker? Or, are you a risk averter? According to a recent article in the New York Times (Rats That Tend to Gamble Help Reveal Science of Risk by Pam Belluck, March 24, 2016 at page A21), the answer lies in a specific type of neuron or nerve cell in the brain. [...]