About Phyllis Pollack

Phyllis G. Pollack, Esq. the principal of PGP Mediation, has been a mediator in Los Angeles, California since 2000. She has conducted over 2,000 mediations. As an attorney with more than 40 years experience, she utilizes her diverse background to resolve business, commercial, international trade, real estate, employment and lemon law disputes at both the state and federal trial and state appellate court levels. Read more of Phyllis' accomplishments here: https://www.pgpmediation.com/phyllis-g-pollack-biography/

Implicit Bias in Judging!

Recently, I attended a Zoom presentation sponsored by the American Jewish Committee San Francisco entitled, "Judging Implicit Bias: The Role of Implicit Bias in Judicial Decision-making." Two of the presenters- University of Hawaii Professor Justin D. Levinson and Mark Bennett, U. S. District Judge (ret.) discussed an empirical study they [Read More]

By |July 23rd, 2021|Research|

Mediation Briefs and Preparation

Why do mediators request briefs from the parties? No- it is not just to learn about the case. Their more important function is to force the parties to think and analyze their case; to give some thought about the strengths and weaknesses of their respective cases and consequently, their position [Read More]

By |July 16th, 2021|Mediations|

Misremembering!

We have all read and/or heard about studies showing that witnesses more often than not misidentify a suspect in a criminal matter. Now, a recent study reveals that we also misremember our whereabouts at a particular time. Entitled "Where were you on Thursday the 15th?" in The Economist, June 5th, [Read More]

By |July 9th, 2021|Research|

HAPPY JULY 2nd!

(Spoiler alert: I had so much fun putting this together last year that I feel a reprint is in order !) No, that is not a misprint. It is the date that John Adams (in a letter to his wife Abigail, dated July 3, 1776) predicted would be the date [Read More]

By |July 2nd, 2021|Odd stuff|

Certainty Does Not Equate to Accuracy!

In the past, I have discussed studies on the unreliability of witness identification of suspects in criminal proceedings. On May 27, 2021, the California Supreme Court acknowledged that while a witness may have a high degree of certainty with which she identifies a suspect as the culprit, a jury should [Read More]

By |June 25th, 2021|Court Cases|

Noise Is Not Just Noise!

In a recent post, I discussed the distinction between "noise" and "bias" as noted in the new book, Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgment (Hachette Book Group, New York 2021)  by Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony, and Cass R. Sunstein.   Although somewhat intense reading, I managed to finish it and realized [Read More]

By |June 18th, 2021|Research|

It’s Tough Being a Woman!

Two recent studies discussed in Katie Shonk's Harvard PONS blog Challenges Facing Women Negotiators (June 1, 2021) confirm what I have long suspected: it is tough being a woman negotiator. Or more bluntly, any given negotiation scenario is biased against women when men are involved. ("Blog") The first study by [Read More]

By |June 11th, 2021|Research|