Phyllis Pollack

Phyllis Pollack

About Phyllis Pollack

Phyllis G. Pollack, Esq. the principal of PGP Mediation (www.pgpmediation.com), has been a mediator in Los Angeles, California since 2000. She has conducted over 1700 mediations. As an attorney with more than 35 years experience, she utilizes her diverse background to resolve business, commercial, international trade, real estate, employment and lemon law disputes at both the state and federal trial and state appellate court levels. Currently, she is the in­coming chair of State Bar of California’s ADR Committee. She has served on the board of the California Dispute Resolution Council (CDRC) (2012­2013), is a past president and past treasurer of the SCMA Education Foundation (2011­2013) and a past president (2010) of the Southern California Mediation Association (SCMA). Ms. Pollack received her BA degree in sociology in 1973 from Newcomb College of Tulane University and her JD degree from Tulane University School of Law in 1977. She is an active member of both the Louisiana and California bars. Pollack believes that it is never too late to mediate a dispute and recommends mediation over litigation as it allows the parties to decide their own solutions.
20 09, 2019

Culture Differences

By |2019-09-05T12:32:50-07:00September 20th, 2019|Odd stuff|0 Comments

As I mentioned in my last blog post, I started teaching ADR Ethics at USC Gould School of Law last week.   During our discussion of ethics, I asked whether it would be proper to hide information. I posed the following hypothetical:   At mediation, an Insurance company settled a dog bite case for an extremely [...]

13 09, 2019

Building Trust

By |2019-09-05T12:31:31-07:00September 13th, 2019|Research|0 Comments

School has started. More specifically, I have returned as a lecturer in law at  USC’s Gould School of Law teaching ADR Ethics. And, I must say, the first class was very lively. The topic was negotiation ethics. And, at one point, I noted that as a mediator, the most important things I need to accomplish [...]

6 09, 2019

Reminder: State Bar Proposal to Allow Non-Attorneys to Practice Law

By |2019-09-05T12:30:32-07:00September 6th, 2019|News articles|0 Comments

Several weeks ago, I wrote about the proposal by the State Bar to allow non-lawyers to practice law. More specifically, the proposal under the rubric allowing access to justice for more members of society include: Narrowing restrictions on the unauthorized practice of law (UPL) to allow persons or businesses other than a lawyer or law [...]

30 08, 2019

Framing, Process and Empathy: How important they really are!

By |2019-08-19T17:27:58-07:00August 30th, 2019|Actual Mediations|0 Comments

Several weeks ago, I posted a blog about a book I recently read, Negotiating the Impossible by Deepak Malhotra (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., Oakland, Ca. 2016). In it, the author notes that three things are paramount to resolving the most intractable disputes: Framing, Process and Empathy. By “framing”, the author means presenting a proposal objectively so [...]

23 08, 2019

Apologies Are Not for Everyone!

By |2019-08-05T16:23:32-07:00August 23rd, 2019|News articles|0 Comments

In my various mediator trainings, the use of an apology as a means of resolving a dispute has often been discussed and advocated. Indeed, books have even been written on the use and power of an apology. (See for example: On Apology by Aaron Lazare). I have even advocated its use in some of my [...]

16 08, 2019

It Is All About Trust!

By |2019-08-02T10:18:22-07:00August 16th, 2019|Actual Mediations|0 Comments

The one thing I love about being a mediator is that it constantly brings new challenges and new insights into people. A recent mediation is no exception. In that mediation, for the first time, defense counsel advised that her client wished to proceed to trial because it believed that the alleged defect was not caused [...]

9 08, 2019

Should you Set A Goal?

By |2019-07-25T16:01:14-07:00August 9th, 2019|Research|0 Comments

The Harvard Negotiation PON’s recent blog raises an interesting issue: in a negotiation should you set a goal? In “The Anchoring Effect and How It Can Impact Your Negotiation”, it answers “yes”. Noting that the “anchoring effect is a cognitive bias that describes the common human tendency to rely too heavily on the first piece [...]

2 08, 2019

Process Before Substance

By |2019-07-23T16:21:13-07:00August 2nd, 2019|Research|0 Comments

As part of a book club group, I recently read Negotiating the Impossible: How to Break Deadlocks and Resolve Ugly Conflicts (Without Money or Muscle) by Deepak Malhotra (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc. 2016). The thesis of the book is simple: to resolve any conflict, one must employ Framing, Process and Empathy. Framing is how to present [...]